Our Mission

Founded in 2020, Minds of POC (or Minds of People of Colour)'s goal is to improve support for people of colour in a multifaceted way, whether that be in their workplace, healthcare, personal lives or in education. We recognise that in order to do this, it is important to address the societal injustices people of colour face such as racism, sexism and homophobia. Minds of POC deliver workshops and consultations in order to ensure that the environments people of colour are in are equitable and equipped to better support them.​ 

We deliver radical educative workshops and consultations, as we believe transformative change cannot come from equality, diversity and unconscious bias trainings which do little to explore the systemic injustices people of colour face. If your organisation is ready for conversations beyond equality and diversity, ready to look more introspectively and critically, then we are the organisation for you.

What does it mean for training to be radical?

Radical training goes beyond the surface level of an issue and instead seeks to examine its very roots, encouraging the active questioning of preconceived notions and ideals.

Our team

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OGE OBIOHA

Co-Founder

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Oge is a Law graduate, who was elected as the Wellbeing Officer in the year 2018/19, where her manifesto had a specific focus on supporting Black students and their mental health, fighting for a culturally competent wellbeing service. During that year, she hosted an event about Black students’ mental health, which tackled racial trauma and the effects on students and their studies. Oge was then elected as President for the year 2019/20, where she led an entire team of officers of colour, collated a 'how to support Black students' guide and continued work with decolonisation across the institution.

 
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sana ali

Co-Founder

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Sana Ali is a Psychology with Cognitive Neuroscience graduate, who was elected as the Wellbeing Officer for the year 2019/20, where her manifesto had a specific focus on improving the inclusivity of the wellbeing services, carrying on Oge's work. During her year, she was involved in hiring new counsellors of colour to ensure the service was able to better support students of colour and she hosted an event around Black mental health, highlighting how to support Black students. Additionally, she has created a leaflet on managing panic attacks and introduced the first body positivity campaign on campus.